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Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

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doi:10.5194/npg-2016-72
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
07 Dec 2016
Review status
A revision of this discussion paper was accepted for the journal Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics (NPG) and is expected to appear here in due course.
Trajectory encounter number as a diagnostic of mixing potential in fluid flows
Irina I. Rypina and Larry J. Pratt Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Physical Oceanography department, 266 Woods Hole rd., Woods Hole MA, 02543
Abstract. Fluid parcels can exchange water properties when coming in contact with each other, leading to mixing. The trajectory encounter number, which quantifies the number of fluid parcel trajectories that pass close to a reference trajectory over a finite time interval, is introduced as a measure of the mixing potential of a flow. Regions characterized by low encounter numbers, such as cores of coherent eddies, have low mixing potential, whereas turbulent or chaotic regions characterized by large encounter numbers have high mixing potential. The encounter number diagnostic was used to characterize mixing potential in 3 flows of increasing complexity: the Duffing Oscillator, the Bickley Jet, and the altimetry-based velocity in the Gulf Stream Extension region. An additional example was presented where the encounter number was combined with the u-star-approach of Pratt et al., 2016 to characterize the mixing potential for a specific tracer distribution in the Bickley Jet flow. Analytical relationships were derived connecting encounter number to diffusivity for purely-diffusive flows, and to shear and strain rates for linear shear and linear strain flows, respectively. It is shown that in a diffusive regime the encounter number grows as a square-root of time, whereas in a linear shear and strain flows the encounter number is proportional to time.

Citation: Rypina, I. I. and Pratt, L. J.: Trajectory encounter number as a diagnostic of mixing potential in fluid flows, Nonlin. Processes Geophys. Discuss., doi:10.5194/npg-2016-72, in review, 2016.
Irina I. Rypina and Larry J. Pratt
Interactive discussionStatus: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version      Supplement - Supplement
 
RC1: 'review report', Anonymous Referee #1, 02 Jan 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
 
RC2: 'Review of Rypina and Pratt', Anonymous Referee #2, 02 Jan 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
 
SC1: 'SC', Konstantin Koshel, 19 Jan 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
 
AC1: 'answers to reviewers', Irina I. Rypina, 16 Mar 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
 
AC2: 'revised paper', Irina I. Rypina, 16 Mar 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
Irina I. Rypina and Larry J. Pratt
Irina I. Rypina and Larry J. Pratt

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Short summary
Fluid parcels exchange water properties when coming in contact with each other, leading to mixing. The trajectory encounter number, which quantifies the number of fluid parcel trajectories that pass close to a reference trajectory over a finite time interval, is introduced as a measure of the mixing potential of a flow. Regions with low encounter numbers, such as cores of coherent eddies, have low mixing potential, whereas turbulent or chaotic regions have large encounter numbers.
Fluid parcels exchange water properties when coming in contact with each other, leading to...
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