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Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

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https://doi.org/10.5194/npgd-2-619-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
17 Apr 2015
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It has been under review for the journal Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics (NPG). The revised manuscript was not accepted.
Critical behavior in earthquake energy dissipation
J. Wanliss1, V. Muñoz2, D. Pastén2, B. Toledo2, and J. A. Valdivia2 1Department of Physics and Computer Science, Presbyterian College, Clinton, South Carolina, USA
2Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago, Chile
Abstract. We explore bursty multiscale energy dissipation from earthquakes flanked by latitudes 29 and 35.5° S, and longitudes 69.501 and 73.944° W (in the Chilean central zone). Our work compares the predictions of a theory of nonequilibrium phase transitions with nonstandard statistical signatures of earthquake complex scaling behaviors. For temporal scales less than than 84 h, time development of earthquake radiated energy activity follows an algebraic arrangement consistent with estimates from the theory of nonequilibrium phase transitions. There are no characteristic scales for probability distributions of sizes and lifetimes of the activity bursts in the scaling region. The power-law exponents describing the probability distributions suggest that the main energy dissipation takes place due to largest bursts of activity, such as major earthquakes, as opposed to smaller activations which contribute less significantly though they have greater relative occurrence. The results obtained provide statistical evidence that earthquake energy dissipation mechanisms are essentially "scale-free," displaying statistical and dynamical self-similarity. Our results provide some evidence that earthquake radiated energy and directed percolation belong to a similar universality class.

Citation: Wanliss, J., Muñoz, V., Pastén, D., Toledo, B., and Valdivia, J. A.: Critical behavior in earthquake energy dissipation, Nonlin. Processes Geophys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/npgd-2-619-2015, 2015.
J. Wanliss et al.
Interactive discussionStatus: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version      Supplement - Supplement
 
RC C134: 'REVIEW OF Critical Behavior in Earthquake Energy Dissipation', Anonymous Referee #1, 28 Apr 2015 Printer-friendly Version 
 
RC C153: 'Referee Report', Anonymous Referee #2, 18 May 2015 Printer-friendly Version 
AC C186: 'Reply to reviewer 2', James Wanliss, 01 Jun 2015 Printer-friendly Version 
 
AC C188: 'Reply to reviewer 1', James Wanliss, 02 Jun 2015 Printer-friendly Version 
J. Wanliss et al.
J. Wanliss et al.

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Short summary
We explore bursty multiscale energy dissipation from earthquakes by comparing predictions of nonequilibrium phase transitions with nonstandard statistical signatures of earthquake scaling. Do earthquakes fit the hypothesis of an avalanching critical system? We study a set of new power law exponents, and compare these explicitly to predictions for critical avalanching systems. At below 84 hours radiated energy follows patterns fitting the theory of nonequilibrium phase transitions.
We explore bursty multiscale energy dissipation from earthquakes by comparing predictions of...
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